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ROD SNOW - LEGEND OF NEWPORT RUGBY

Rod Snow was inducted into the Newport Rugby Hall of Fame on May 6 2016 at Rodney Parade. The event recognised his huge impact at Newport RFC and Rodney Parade during a ten year period starting in December 1995. The Canadian prop was not only a marvellous player but a loyal and devoted servant of Newport RFC. One of the very best to pull on a Black and Amber shirt.

TRIBUTE FILM

NEWPORT RFC APPEARANCES - 190 TRIES - 30 / FIRST NEWPORT UNITED APPEARANCE - Newport United v Chepstow 11/11/1995 / FIRST NEWPORT RFC APPEARANCE - Newport v Pontypridd 6/1/1996

INTERNATIONAL RECORD - 61 CAPS, 8 TRIES. SCORED TRY IN WORLD CUP 1995 v ROMANIA

BORN - COME-BY-CHANCE, BONAVISTA, NEWFOUNDLAND 1/5/1970

TESTIMONIAL MATCH - 21/5/2015

LAST APPEARANCE FOR NEWPORT v SWANSEA 23/4/2005

 

PROGRAMME ARTICLE WRITTEN FOR TESTIMONIAL

GOOD BYE TO ALL THAT

We are gathered here today to pay homage to a true Newport rugby legend – Gerald Arthur Rod Snow.  From Come-by-chance he came by chance to Rodney Parade and from the time he first put on the Black and Amber shirt against Chepstow in November 1995 he has served the club unfailingly and with great distinction. From Newfoundland Dogs to ‘who let the dogs out’ Rod can reflect today on a wonderful career with Newport and with Canada.

As a supporter of recent vintage there is no player that has given me more pleasure to watch. There is no player that has got me out of my seat and almost on the field as he charged towards the opposition with, it seems, the whole of the city of Newport behind him!

In the ten-year period at Newport he has seen the club experience many changes. But (thankfully) he has stayed loyal throughout despite the obvious temptation of playing in England or in France. When he joined the Black and Ambers it was only three months after the Chairman of the International Rugby Board, Vernon Pugh, had declared the game professional. He took his place alongside compatriot Gareth Rees, facing Pontypridd and Ystradgynlais in consecutive games. He stuck with us despite some difficult seasons including 1997-98 when every League was lost. And then he flourished as Tony Brown brought some of rugby’s greatest names to Newport and set the Welsh rugby scene alight. Many of those stars will be here today to afford their respects to Snowy.

Rod Snow has embodied the spirit and doggedness of Newport rugby in the last decade. He is a clubman in an era when those bygone values are past. It is particularly poignant that David Waters, Newport’s greatest clubman, will be donning Black and Amber or a version of it again today.

His style of play combines the grit and hard work associated with the many powerful props who have played for Newport over the years. But he has the modern flair for open spaces. I am not sure if he is a winger’s prop or a prop’s winger but there are many occasions when he has taken the ball off the outside centre or full back on his way to the try-line.

The tries have been prolific including a memorable double on the right wing at Sardis Road and a clinching try in the rain-swept cup win over the old enemy, Cardiff greeted by a clenched fist salute to the Hazell Stand.

Never mind the mythical “tarw” Snowy is the original rampaging bull.  Whether scattering the Bath defence or deflecting away Pat Lam in their oft-replayed collision his attacking charges have brought forth the Rodney Parade roar.

As an overseas player he has not always met with the approval of our petty officialdom. At Stradey Park Gareth Simmonds unfairly adjudged that Snowy had late-tackled on two occasions and was red-carded. But the lapses have been few. And in the manner of every good prop if there is a “shoot-out” amongst the forwards Snowy will be in the thick of it. I am just glad he has been our side.

As an adopted Newportonian he shares many of our City’s characteristics. He is rough-hewn, dogged, determined, generous of spirit, a fighter, and ultimately a winner. I am sure these are Canadian characteristics too. Rod has been generous with supporters throughout his time here. He has always had time for us and shown considerable commitment to the many community initiatives developed by Newport Rugby. He has played his part in spreading the message of this wonderful game.  

It may not be politically correct but when he said recently that when he played for the regional team he was still playing for the old Newport it struck a particular chord with many of us. He then paid his proper respects to the Newport tradition when he turned out in the Swansea game recently. End of an era. The end of the glittering array of overseas stars at Rodney Parade who forged such a strong bond with the Black and Amber Army on the terraces. The end of the Tony Brown investment fund. We never had it so good is an over-used phrase but at Newport rugby, we never had it so good.